WW1 US ARMY 4th DIVISION DOUGHBOY'S ROUGH WOOL UNIFORM JACKET ~ LARGER SIZE ~ For Sale


WW1 US ARMY 4th DIVISION DOUGHBOY'S ROUGH WOOL UNIFORM JACKET ~ LARGER SIZE  ~

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WW1 US ARMY 4th DIVISION DOUGHBOY'S ROUGH WOOL UNIFORM JACKET ~ LARGER SIZE ~:
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ORIGINAL WW1 US ARMY DOUGHBOY'S M-1910 ROUGH WOOL UNIFORM JACKET, 4th INFANTRY 'IVY' DIVISION SHOULDER PATCH, SERGEANT RANK, INFANTRY COLLAR BRASS, OVERSEAS SERVICE CUFF INSIGNIA, HONORABLE DISCHARGE RED CHEVRON, VICTORY RIBBON BAR WITH BATTLE STARS, 1917 DATED, LARGER SIZE, MEASURES; 15 INCH NECK, 20 INCHES ACROSS THE CHEST, 17 INCHES ACROSS THE SHOULDERS, 23 INCH SLEEVE. VERY GOOD CONDITION. WILL COMBINE SHIPPING.World War I

The 4th Division was organized atCamp Greene,North Carolinaon 10 December 1917 under the command of Maj. Gen.George H. Cameron. It was here they adopted their distinctive insignia, the four ivy leaves. The ivy leaf came from the Roman numerals for four (IV) and signified their motto “Steadfast and Loyal”. The division was organized as part of the United States buildup following the Declaration of War on 6 April 1917 and the entry of the United States into the war on the side of the British and French.

[edit]Organization
  • 7th Infantry Brigade
    • 39th Infantry Regiment
    • 47th Infantry Regiment
    • 11th Machine Gun Battalion
  • 8th Infantry Brigade
    • 58th Infantry Regiment
    • 59th Infantry Regiment
    • 12th Machine Gun Battalion
  • 4th Artillery Brigade
    • 13th Field Artillery Regiment
    • 16th Field Artillery Regiment
    • 77th Field Artillery Regiment
  • 4th Engineer Regiment
  • 8th Field Signal Battalion
  • 4th Train Headquarters and Military Police
    • 4th Ammunition Train
    • 4th Supply Train
    • 4th Engineer Train
    • 4th Sanitary Train
      • 19th Field Hospital
      • 21st Field Hospital
      • 28th Field Hospital
      • 33rd Field style="line-height: 19px; margin: 0.3em 0px 0px 1.6em; padding: 0px; list-style-image: font-family: sans-serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); ">
      • Total authorized strength for the division approached 32,000.
      [edit]St. Mihiel Offensive

      For theSt. Mihiel Campaign, the division moved into an area south of Verdun as part of the1st American Army. Gen. Pershing, commander of theAmerican Expeditionary Force(AEF), had gotten the French and British to agree that the AEF would fight under its own organizational elements. One of the first missions assigned to the AEF was the reduction of the St. Mihiel salient. The 4th Division, assigned to V Corps, was on the western face of the salient. The plan was for V Corps to push generally southeast and to meet IV Corps who was pushing northwest, thereby trapping the Germans in the St. Mihiel area.

      The 59th Infantry Regiment moved into an area previously occupied by the French, deploying along a nine kilometer front. On 12 September, the first patrols were sent forward by the 59th. The 4th Division attack began on 14 September with the 8th Brigade capturing the town ofManheulles. All along the front, the American forces pressed forward and closed the St. Mihiel salient.

      [edit]The Meuse-Argonne Campaign

      On 26 September, the last great battle of World War I, theMeuse-Argonne Campaign, began. Moving under the cover of darkness for secrecy, the Americans had moved into their sector of the front following the completion of their mission in the St. Mihiel area. Three U.S. Army corps were assigned sectors along the U.S. part of the front. III Corps held the extreme right (eastern) part of the front with V Corps to their left. The 4th Division was assigned to III Corps. The III Corps sector had the 33rd Division on the right, the80th Divisionhad the center, and the 4th was assigned the left, with the79th Divisionof V Corps on their left.

      The 7th Brigade was moved to the line in the trenches around Hill 304. The division plan called for one brigade to fight until exhausted and then send the other brigade forward to press the attack. The attack of 26 September was made through a narrow valley. The 7th Brigade moved through the valley and, while taking large numbers of German prisoners, reached the second line of defenses by 09:00 near the town ofCuisy. The Germans provided a formidable opposition, but the 39th Infantry overcame them and moved throughSeptsarges. During this first day, the 7th Brigade had captured 1700 prisoners, and more than 40 guns. Division headquarters was moved forward to Cuisy.

      On 27 September the attack resumed with an artillery barrage. The 39th Infantry followed the barrage until they encountered withering machine gun fire from theBois des Ogonswhere they were held up. The 8th Brigade was brought forward on 29 September to take the place of the 39th on the line. The 8th Brigade moved through the Bois de Brieulles but met increasing machine gun fire from the Bois des Ogons. Very little progress was made over the next four days as the terrible condition of the roads at the rear hampered re-supply and reinforcement efforts. By 3 October, Phase I of the Meuse-Argonne Offensive was over.

      [edit]The Meuse-Argonne Offensive—Phase II

      Through the strenuous efforts of the supply and ammunition trains, enough materiel had been acquired to resume the attack by 3 October. The division plan was to fight its way through the many forests surrounding the city of Brieulles and capture the city. On the morning of 4 October, the 8th Brigade moved out of the foxholes and moved across open ground under the cover of heavy fog. As the fog lifted the Germans opened fired from the front, the left and the right. The 58th fought forward wearing gas masks since many of the projectiles contained gas, finally managing to gain a foothold in theBois de Fays. The line was able to advance no further for the next 4 days enduring constant shelling and German night patrols attempting to infiltrate their lines. Forward movement was again ordered on 9 October with the 7th Brigade attacking. The 8th Brigade was withdrawn for rest. The 39th Infantry was designated as the assaulting unit. The order to attack came just at sundown. With difficulty, the men stumbled forward in darkness wearing gas masks and under fire. Little progress could be made. The 39th withdrew to resume the attack at 07:00 on 10 October. 2/39th led the way and incurred heavy losses. Many of the officers in the 39th were killed or wounded, including all of the majors.

      Another attack was ordered and by 17:30 2/39th had fought through the Bois de Peut de Faux. The men dug in for the night. Early on the morning of the 11th, the entire regimental staff of the 39th was gassed and LTC Troy Middleton, 47th Infantry was ordered to take command of the 39th. Attacking on the morning of 11 October, the 7th Brigade pushed through the Bois de Foret. The orders for 12 October were to clean out the last pockets of German resistance in theBois de Foret. Patrols were sent out to the north side of Hill 299. On 13 October, 4th Division units were relieved by the 4th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Division.

      On 10 October MG John L. Hines was selected to command III Corps. MGGeorge H. Cameronwas returned to the 4th Division as its commander. The 4th was withdrawn from the front on 19 October. During their 24 days of combat they had paid a heavy price with 244 officers and 7,168 men killed or wounded. They had fought their way over 13 kilometers and captured 2,731 enemy prisoners. The division relocated to Lucey as part of Second Army. MG Cameron received a new assignment to return to the U.S. to train new divisions on 22 October. Command passed temporarily to BG Benjamin, Commander, 7th Brigade before MGMark L. Herseyarrived to assume command on 31 October.

      The Armistice ending the war was signed on 11 November 1918. The last casualties in the division were suffered by13th Field Artilleryat 14:00 11 November 1918.

      • World War I casualties
        • 2,611 killed in action
        • 9,895 wounded in duty

          Under the terms of the Armistice, Germany was to evacuate all territory west of the Rhine. American troops were to relocate to the center section of this previously German occupied area all the way to the Koblenz bridgehead on the Rhine. The 4th marched into Germany, covering 330 miles in 15 days where it was widely dispersed over an area with Bad Bertrich as Division headquarters. The division established training for the men as well as sports and educational activities. In April 1919 the division moved to a new occupation area further north on the Rhine.

          The division went north to Ahrweiler Germany in the Rheinland-Phalz area. In July the division returned to France and the last detachment sailed for the United States on 31 July 1919. On 21 September 1921, the 4th Division was inactivated atCamp Lewis, Washington as part of the Army Reorganization Act of 1920.

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